"Displace" - the best word to describe the current state of humankind and this planet earth. Displace is both negative and positive.

Anything relates to art and design, environments, cities and societies, world of cultures, places and people.

Compiled by Desmond Ong
fotojournalismus:

Istanbul, 1986.
[Credit : Ara Güler]

fotojournalismus:

Istanbul, 1986.

[Credit : Ara Güler]

1 year ago
162 notes
fotojournalismus:

People struggle through floodwaters in Jakarta’s central business district on January 17, 2013 in Jakarta, Indonesia. Thousands of Indonesians were displaced and the capital was covered in many key areas in over a meter of water after days of heavy rain.
[Credit : Ed Wray/Getty Images]

fotojournalismus:

People struggle through floodwaters in Jakarta’s central business district on January 17, 2013 in Jakarta, Indonesia. Thousands of Indonesians were displaced and the capital was covered in many key areas in over a meter of water after days of heavy rain.

[Credit : Ed Wray/Getty Images]

1 year ago
73 notes
Half of all the world's food - two billion tonnes worth - is thrown out | BBC
Loneliness is the human condition. Cultivate it. The way it tunnels into you allows your soul room to grow. Never expect to outgrow loneliness. Never hope to find people who will understand you, someone to fill that space. An intelligent, sensitive person is the exception, the very great exception. If you expect to find people who will understand you, you will grow murderous with disappointment. The best you’ll ever do is to understand yourself, know what it is that you want, and not let the cattle stand in your way.
Janet Fitch, White Oleander (via showslow)

(via booklover)

1 year ago
6,461 notes

vimeo:

Motoi Yamamoto - Saltscapes by The Avant/Garde Diaries

Artist Motoi Yamamoto travels to the salt flats of western Utah to discuss mortality, rebirth, and crafting art from the salt of the earth. 

1 year ago
35 notes
The presidential family demands organic food in their kitchen, yet behind closed doors, shake hands with the biotech industry. China’s top brass is fed by an exclusive, gated organic garden while the rest of the population consumes GM food, steroid contaminated meat and dairy laced with melamine. Even Monsanto’s own employee’s command non-genetically modified food in their canteen. Access to clean, organic and healthy food is not a given right anymore — it has become a political battleground with the average citizen suffering the loss.

bkda:

동내 한 바퀴

문래동(文來洞, mullaedong)

1 year ago
1 note

kateoplis:

Photos of the week

1 year ago
155 notes
Urban Planet: How Growing Cities Will Wreck the Environment Unless We Build Them Right

entrappedspaces:

image

Today urban areas — ranging from Times Square to a small  town in India — cover perhaps 3 to 5% of global land. But Seto and her co-authors calculate that between now and 2030, urban areas will expand by more than 463,000 sq. mi. (1.2 million sq. km). That’s equal to 20,000 U.S. football fields being paved over every day for the first few decades of this century. By then, a little less than 10% of the planet’s land cover could be urban. “There’s going to be a huge impact on biodiversity hotspots and on carbon emissions in those urban areas,” says Seto.

The bulk of that great urban expansion will be in Asia — where more than 75% of the increase in urban cover is projected to occur — and in Africa, where urban land cover will be 590% above the 2000 level of 16,000 sq. mi.

(via captainplanit)

1 year ago
12 notes
You lost all interest in this world. You were disappointed and discouraged, and lost interest in everything. So you abandoned your physical body. You went to a world apart and you’re living a different kind of life there. In a world that’s inside you.
1Q84, Haruki Murakami   (via mmariamula)

(via booklover)

1 year ago
21,706 notes

inthemess:

An artist (name?) at UNCED created giant fish sculptures out of plastic bottles to highlight the plastic debris problem.

via Huffpo

(via waltermason)

1 year ago
9,283 notes

ryanpanos:

The House in the Middle of the Street 

Homeowners Luo Baogen and his wife refused to allow the government to demolish their home in Wenling, Zhejiang province, China, claiming the relocation compensation offered would not be enough to cover the cost of rebuilding. So, adjacent neighboring homes were dismantled, and, bizarrely, the road was built around the intact home, leaving it as an island in a river of new asphalt.

1 year ago
51 notes